July292014 with 30,219 notes

mage-cat:

I did know any black minerals made crystals quite like this. I wonder what these could be.

Of course, I have a geologist uncle who reads my blog, so I may have an answer before too long.

The geologist hypothesizes these to be particularly dark examples of smoky quartz.

(Source: wylona-hayashi)

July282014 with 4 notes

agentmorris:

agentsterling:

agentmorris:

mage-cat said: It was very hard to read! D:

[*clings* It was so hard to write. ;O;]

[THE ONLY WAY TO FIX THIS IS WITH AN ORGY]

[That’d be sooooome orgy. Angry sex galore.]

Can’t we just cuddle?

10PM with 133,563 notes
“Since her death in 1979, the woman who discovered what the universe is made of has not so much as received a memorial plaque. Her newspaper obituaries do not mention her greatest discovery. […] Every high school student knows that Isaac Newton discovered gravity, that Charles Darwin discovered evolution, and that Albert Einstein discovered the relativity of time. But when it comes to the composition of our universe, the textbooks simply say that the most abundant atom in the universe is hydrogen. And no one ever wonders how we know.”

Jeremy Knowles, discussing the complete lack of recognition Cecilia Payne gets, even today, for her revolutionary discovery. (via alliterate)

OH WAIT LEMME TELL YOU ABOUT CECILIA PAYNE.

Cecilia Payne’s mother refused to spend money on her college education, so she won a scholarship to Cambridge.

Cecilia Payne completed her studies, but Cambridge wouldn’t give her a degree because she was a woman, so she said fuck that and moved to the United States to work at Harvard.

Cecilia Payne was the first person ever to earn a Ph.D. in astronomy from Radcliffe College, with what Otto Strauve called “the most brilliant Ph.D. thesis ever written in astronomy.”

Not only did Cecilia Payne discover what the universe is made of, she also discovered what the sun is made of (Henry Norris Russell, a fellow astronomer, is usually given credit for discovering that the sun’s composition is different from the Earth’s, but he came to his conclusions four years later than Payne—after telling her not to publish).

Cecilia Payne is the reason we know basically anything about variable stars (stars whose brightness as seen from earth fluctuates). Literally every other study on variable stars is based on her work.

Cecilia Payne was the first woman to be promoted to full professor from within Harvard, and is often credited with breaking the glass ceiling for women in the Harvard science department and in astronomy, as well as inspiring entire generations of women to take up science.

Cecilia Payne is awesome and everyone should know her.

(via bansheewhale)

(via quasifesto)

9PM with 66,858 notes

ace-enjolras:

I don’t think writers realize that “strong female character” means “well written female character” and not “female character who punches stuff and shoots stuff”

(via theinnkeeperlibrarian)

9PM with 11,656 notes

Alan Tudyk’s and Nathan Fillion’s encounter with Justin Bieber at the Halo 3 release party (x)

(Source: richardcastles, via seananmcguire)

8PM with 70,335 notes

nicholaskole:

I don’t generally reblog things. But Miyazaki is an exception, and this is so so so so beautiful. He gets it.

Everything ends. Enjoy it while it is here.

(Source: ricktimus, via ursulavernon)

8PM with 29,976 notes
spikefuckingjonze:

anyone else noticing a trend here?

Oh, that’s just…

spikefuckingjonze:

anyone else noticing a trend here?

Oh, that’s just…

(via kimithegreat)

8PM with 8 notes
8PM with 20,560 notes

tokomon:

"Douse yourself in water and repent!" 1995 // 2014

(via pretty-guardians)

8PM with 30,219 notes

I did know any black minerals made crystals quite like this. I wonder what these could be.

Of course, I have a geologist uncle who reads my blog, so I may have an answer before too long.

(Source: wylona-hayashi, via luongomaplebacon)

← Older entries Page 1 of 683